Why Opium Poppies?

Overgrow Canada is expanding!

I’m Dana Larsen, and in 2016 I started the Overgrow Canada campaign. This is an effort to normalize cannabis plants by planting and growing them in public.

Over the past three years, I have given away millions of cannabis seeds, and encouraged people to plant them in front of city hall, in traffic circles, in community parks and other public places.

Many thousands of Canadians joined the campaign, planted their seeds and helped to overgrow our country with cannabis.

I’m still giving away cannabis seeds, but in 2019 I am launching a new phase of the Overgrow campaign. I am encouraging people to grow opium poppies!

A SAFE SUPPLY

To stop the overdose crisis, Canada needs a safe supply of opiates. While governments stall on ending prohibition, I want to help create that safe drug supply.

I am asking Canadians to grow opium properties on your own property, and send me the heads when they are ripe. I will extract the opium and provide it in safe dosages to those who need it.”

OPIUM TEA IS SAFER

Every decade since Canada banned opium in 1908 we have seen more overdoses. Prohibition of opium tea leads to the use of heroin, and ultimately of heroin leads to fentanyl.

The same phenomenon was documented in southeast asia, where the opium ban led directly to a boom in heroin use.

BC’s southeast asian community saw the same thing happen over the past decade. When their supply of opium poppy tea was cut off in 2009, there was a big jump in heroin use and overdose deaths over the following years.

I’m not saying there aren’t issues around drinking opium tea, but the fact is that drinking opium tea is far safer than using heroin. We need a safe drug supply, and opium tea is pretty much the safest way to use opiates.

This is why I am asking for people to grow some opium poppies and send them my way. This is an experiment, to see if we can crowdsource enough opium tea to make a difference in this overdose crisis.

Thank you for helping me to make a safe drug supply and stop the overdose death crisis.